Bing & Ruth – No Home of the Mind

Bing & Ruth may sound like a novelty act from the 70s, but those with their ear to the ground of ambient music will know that it’s really David Moore and his merry band of musicians. A pianist from Kansas, Moore studied at the New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music in New York’s Greenwich Village. Moore was writing the sort of music he wanted to hear: minimalist ensemble music with a certain filmic sensitivity, one which prioritised grace and texture over the style’s once-radical subtraction.

While at times No Home of the Mind may seem soporific, there is a sense of storytelling and urgency that requires attention. Moore’s style of continuous playing conjuring a flurry of piano notes evokes images of movement. However there are haunting phases that hover and use the ensemble to full effect such as ‘Is Drop’ and ‘Chonchos’. What remains consistent is the relationship between the woodwinds and strings and what Moore plays on the keyboard. They respond to his rise and fall along the frequency spectrum.

It is an impressive collection of contemporary classical, the likes of which support the notion that whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

Moore constantly changes the mood and purpose of the piano. It exists mainly as a drone instrument producing a scuttling pilgrimage of notes (as on ‘Form Takes). However, in moments of solace, it provides a ruminative base on which the other instruments can stir the soul (as on “To All It).

With beautifully-crafted compositions, No Home of the Mind avoids falling into chaos as the lines of acoustic and electronic are blurred. It is an impressive collection of contemporary classical, the likes of which support the notion that whole is greater than the sum of its parts. What is clear, especially as I listen to ‘Flat Line/Peak Color’, is that Moore undoubtedly has the potential to be composing the scores of our films and TV series for the years to come.

 

By Will Hunt


Noteworthy Details

An impressive project of contemporary classical
The whole is greater than the sum of its parts
Moore deserves a chance to score the visual arts

 

Rating

8/10



Track List
1. Starwood Choker
2. As Much as Possible
3. Scrapes
4. Chonchos
5. The How of it Sped
6. Is Drop
7. Form Takes
8. To All It
9. Flat Line/Peak Color
10. What Ash it Flow Up